Good Adolf Hitler?

Posted: 04/09/2008 in hidden truth
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Good Adolf Hitler?

Was there anything good in him – Did anyone say anything positive about him?

Kind and paternal man who ate little aside from mashed potato and passionately loved his dog.
· I admit, I was fascinated by Adolf Hitler. He was a pleasant boss and a fatherly friend. I deliberately ignored all the warning voices inside me and enjoyed the time by his side almost until the bitter end.
· It wasn’t what he said, but the way he said things and how he did things. Such things included his modest appetite, and the way he ate only side dishes – always avoiding meat.
· Hitler’s greatest pleasure was when (sheepdog) Blondie would jump a few centimetres higher than the last time, and he would say that going out with his dog was the most relaxing thing he could do.
· “Are you well rested, my child?” Hitler asked. “I have something to dictate to you.”
Traudl Junge, Hitler’s secretary (2)

· “Nobody is bad all their life. Hitler was charming, humoristic, and a very good mimic. He used to do imitations of actresses and King Victor Emmanuel by moving his upper lip like a rabbit’s.”
· Hitler enjoyed telling jokes about the British. “He particularly liked Colonel Blimp jokes, not sex or political ones. He always talked nicely about England – he never wanted to endanger it.”
· Hitler was handsome, particularly in the morning. “His face used to change as the day went on because of the drugs he took to help him sleep. But in the morning his eyes were big and wonderful deep blue.”
· Hitler had “beautiful eyes” and was a “perfectly nice person”.
Reinhard Spitzy, who deserted the Nazis to become a member of the German resistance, worked with Hitler in Austria after he had annexed the country in 1938. (1)

· “Sweetest love, favorite of my heart, my one and only, my dearest, my truest and hottest beloved,” one of the letters begins. “I could kiss you a thousand times and still not be satisfied. My love for you is endless, so tender, so hot and so complete.”
· The letters are addressed to “My beloved Fuhrer,” “My darling sugar- sweet AdoIf,” or simply, “Dear Adi.”
· “I am making you keys to my front door and my room,” wrote one woman. “We have to be very careful. So come early, ring my landlady’s bell and ask if I’m at home. If everything works out, my parents (they could be your in-laws) say you can come any time, so we can spend the night together at my parents’ house!”
Love Letters to Adolf Hitler from german women, discovered from the destroyed Chancellery (3)

· British prime minister Stanley Baldwin pays tribute to Hitler as “a remarkable man” who made “great achievements”.
· “Like you, I acknowledge (Hitler’s) great achievements since taking over that troubled country. The German people obviously love him, even if that love puts a burden on them both and is not extended to the Jews who are tormented.”
1936 Letter of British prime minister Stanley Baldwin (4)

· Hitler’s authority was extraordinary. He was always polite and charming. There was really nothing to object to.
· Hitler was fond of (Goebbels) children, and drank hot chocolate with them and allowed them to use his bathtub.
Erna Flegel, Nurse in Hitler’s Bunker 1945 (5)

· “After visiting these two places you can easily see how that within a few years Hitler will emerge from the hatred that surrounds him now as one of the most significant figures who ever lived. He had boundless ambition for his country, which rendered him a menace to the peace of the world, but he had a mystery about him in the way that he lived and in the manner of his death that will live and grow after him. He had in him the stuff of which legends are made.”
John F. Kennedy, in his Post-War diary, as quoted in Prelude to Leadership (pages 73-74, last two paragraphs). (8)

· When Hugh Trevor-Roper was asked: “Do you consider Hitler consciously evil? Did he know what he was doing was wrong?” His answer was an emphatic No: Hitler was convinced of his own rectitude. Although his deeds reached an extreme of awfulness, he committed them in the deluded belief that they were right.
Historian Hugh Trevor-Roper, who In 1945 was ordered by the British government to investigate Hitler’s death (6)

· Hitler wanted only the best for Germany, though he made some mistakes.
General Heinz Guderian, author of “Achtung – Panzer!”, in 1950 (7)

· “Hitler was also an individual of great courage, a soldier’s soldier in the Great War, a political organizer of the first rank, a leader steeped in the history of Europe, who possessed oratorical powers that could awe even those who despised him…Hitler’s success was not based on his extraordinary gifts alone. His genius was an intuitive sense of the mushiness, the character flaws, the weakness masquerading as morality that was in the hearts of the statesmen who stood in his path.”
Pat Buchanan, in a 1977 column discussing John Toland’s biography of Hitler (8)

ps: no matter what this sophisticated people say about this “noble” man, that doesnt make him a   mahatma in peoples heart and he remains as a symbol of terror………………..

 

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